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842 E. Washington Street Suite B San Diego, CA 92103

Sunday, November 26: 6:30 - 9:00PM.

We are all on this voyage together!

I was fortunate in my teens to have a wise and creative friend with whom I explored the world through Zen Koans, Native Americans' values and ways of being on the earth. J.R.Tolkien, C.S Lewis and Kurt Vonnegut were among are guides to finding epic meaning in the turbulent times of Watergate and Vietnam.

We spent days in the Texas woods in silence: learning tracking, attempting to walk quietly with heavy feet along leafy trails, and eventually moving into our own vision quests.
We practiced mantras and yoga to find what was in them of value. When we read philosophies or concepts we didn't understand, we held them as Koans, and sat with them to receive the kernels of meaning.  
Partly because I was young, it was difficult for me to get the full context of why humans did the things they did. If I'd made it through War and Peace, I might have sat in meditation with this quote from Chapter 12 to better understand it...

From Ch 12 of war and peace, by Leo Tolstoy, 1869

As in the question of astronomy then, so in the question of history now, the whole difference of opinion is based on the recognition or nonrecognition of something absolute, serving as the measure of visible phenomena. In astronomy it was the immovability of the earth, in history it is the independence of personality- free will.

As with astronomy the difficulty of recognizing the motion of the earth lay in abandoning the immediate sensation of the earth's fixity and of the motion of the planets, so in history the difficulty of recognizing the subjection of personality to the laws of space, time, and cause lies in renouncing the direct feeling of the independence of one's own personality. But as in astronomy the new view said: "It is true that we do not feel the movement of the earth, but by admitting its immobility we arrive at absurdity, while by admitting its motion (which we do not feel) we arrive at laws," so also in history the new view says: "It is true that we are not conscious of our dependence, but by admitting our free will we arrive at absurdity, while by admitting our dependence on the external world, on time, and on cause, we arrive at laws."

In the first case it was necessary to renounce the consciousness of an unreal immobility in space and to recognize a motion we did not feel; in the present case it is similarly necessary to renounce a freedom that does not exist, and to recognize a dependence of which we are not conscious.


This passage echos Buddhist teachings regarding our interdependence and reliance as humans on our environment and circumstances and cause, though we will debate the idea of free will, probably for eternity.
We all know 'the secret" of manifesting, yet how many change our lives dramatically? How many of us will be remembered a century from now? And as we envision a better world for all, how do we influence those who don't see our vision?
 We trust that whispers of truth from the great mystery speak to all of our hearts when we are ready to hear.

In our breath session we take the time to acknowledge our connection with this great expanse of universe and through breath experience our connection. We access the source of beauty, purpose, and meaning in our short, anonymous lives, in order to experience the magnificence of creation.

Whatever it is you need: a respite from busy-ness, a 'breather', or if  you have Koans in your life to ponder, or all called to a brief yet profound vision quest, come join us!

RSVP: 619-203-7152
November 26,2017 6:30-9:00
Dress comfortably,
Bring pillow and blanket or yoga mat.
Tea and snacks will follow the session.

Fee:  $25
First time attendees: $15